Annals of Sales: The Golden Hours

August 24, 2010 at 5:04 AM | Posted in Annals of Sales, Business | 1 Comment
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Huey Long with a solid wave

 

In my first Sales Training at ITT Courier we were addressed by the Senior Salesperson who was really a legend at the company. He was the one who broke EDS as an account and that made the company go. Back in 1979 Ross Perot was still running EDS and they were a big deal and very well-respected — they won large contracts on a consistent basis and it was our terminals that were their tentacles out from their gigantic data centers.   

This fellow seemed old to me then but he may have 45. He gave off a good vibe and listening to him I was not surprised that he was successful. He told us a story and then gave us some very good advice.   

He told us that in selling to EDS he made sure that they never forgot him. On days when he didn’t have an appointment, he would walk from the front of their building to the back waving and smiling to everyone in his wake. Then, after a rest in the men’s room, he’d walk from back to front, taking a different route. Classic!   

Before I relate his advice I want to tell you about expenses at Burroughs, my prior company. We were not allowed to expense more than $23.50 a week — no matter what. One time at a sales meeting, Phil Garfinkle, our Branch Manager gave a talk on a whole new expense system with more money for miles driven. At the end he said there was one more thing: we could still only spend $23.50 a week. It was funny.   

Eat for free!

 

So back at ITT the great rep told us that we were the luckiest guys (all guys) in the world: the company wanted to pay us to take people to breakfast and lunch. He told us that the early morning hours through lunch were the Golden Hours for sales and that if we wanted to succeed we needed to maximize that time.   

Yes, we do. We surely do.

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1 Comment »

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  1. I will always remember you talking about the guy walking the floors. A classic story that is always relevant no matter the time.


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